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20130204
20130212
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
creates an environment where they have some of the best job growth of any state in the country. liz: this is about how texas runs its business as a state. texas meets every other year. >> the fewest amount of days they work of a legislatur any ln the country. i think it would be a blueprint for washington here. lower taxes, lower legal costs for corporations, lower tax rates, create a friendly environment and job growth is amazing. liz: we have all sorts of reform movement, estate tax reform working out, leopard experiments, at the same time governor jerry brown saying the capital of his state, called essentially the pretzel palace of complexity. this is sacramento passing measures. >> they passed one lie after another. very difficult. the wealthy, people who can afford to do it, corporations can say i will go to business somewhere else. you saw what happened with bowlinbowlingboeing looking to o california. the ones who can least afford it to stay behind, more burden on their shoulders. liz: i understand what you're saying about state capital here in new york and california from th
. the condo market in the major environments is on fire. melissa: really? dottie, do you agree with that? yeah, real estate is back, buy, buy, buy. i heard that before. tell me in a convincing way. >> no, it's back. in fact, new york a year and a half ago, but back across the country, and there's also a shortage of inventory. you have to buy it and buy it quick. melissa: that's a good sales pitch. madison, in l.a., things flying off the lot there, i was going to say "shelf," but there's not the shelf. >> flying off the cove, yes. they are flying, and the market has taken off exciting, this year, so far, we had a big sale of $75 million in malibu with a foreign buyer. it's taking off to a good start. melissa: ridiculous. jeff, let me ask you, when i look at the lot of the markets that are on fire right now, it really concerns me because it looks like all the same problems that we saw last time around, for example, one of the markets you think is going to do the best is phoenix. i know zillow projectses prices in phoenix could be up 8.5% next year. that makes me nervous. >> the reality is that t
. >> but they've created this environment for this to happen. what do you mean? that's a risk decision that companies are making for some reason they've decided they need to operate with massive and huge cash balances, okay? and for whatever reason, there have been an absence of investors like iron horn who said, give me back the cash. find a way to redistribute it. i don't know, bob, in terms of macroeconomic development -- >> i think some of the corporate cash comes from firms that have made money and they don't feel like taking risk in this environment. apple is the technology company and i can understand apple's view that they have freedom of cash on the balance sheet. some of this is complicated. some of the cash is overseas, they bring it home, thee incur some tax liability. cash on your balance sheet is freedom. it's freedom from bankers. >> we're going to slip in a quick break. bob, you're going to be with us for the rest of the hour. and i'm going to send it back to pebble beach and the one and only becky quick. >> when we come back, we're talking about putting money to work b
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we just heard from two parents who saw sin ethic pot destroy their son's life. i'm joined by two people on the front lines. you both work for the bureau of investigation and ken is a gbi agent and investigates the distribution and sale of synthetic drugs. good to see you both. thank you for being here to educate us more about this. i actually had not heard of this. but it sounds like, is this right, ken, it's an epidemic? >> it really is. it has blown up on us in the metro atlanta area and around the nation in the past four or five years. >> we're talking thousands of percent. this is something thrust to the forefront, particularly here in atlanta but this is maybe something a lot of parents haven't even heard about? >> yes. surprisingly enough, it has flown under the radar, some wholesale manufacturers and distribu
and challenging economic environment. our gross margins were the highest they have ever been. we had record cash flow at $1.3 billion. we had a very successful year and our aim is to carry that momentum into 2013. we will talk to analysts about our strategies and how we would like to do that. >> ty? >> i would like to ask mr. stockton a couple of questions that seem to me to be a possible head winds for your company. number one, are young children playing as much with what we would call traditional toys or are they substituting handheld devices and other electronics? that's number one. number two, for your business, are you heavily dependent, more than you used to be, on the success of other company's franchises, character franchises, whether it is disney or universal characters for your success. >> that's a great couple of questions. let me start with digital play. we track kids play all the time as you might expect since we are the largest toy company in the world. what we found is that traditional play is really unchanged. it is about 30 minutes a day. and it has been about that time for the
and police may have undetectable drones that can drive, fly, swim into nearly any environment. >> there may be as many as 30,000 unmanned vehicles in the air. >> professor nathan busch says designers are modeling the newest drones on nature. >> so mimicking the actions of insects, the way that they crawl, for example, or fly. >> reporter: they may be so small and agile the drones could access tight spaces, impossible for police to get to today. when the army was funding research into small robotic birds, we got a good look at each other. >> reporter: right now the hummingbird can only fly a little more than 10 minutes. at that size, imagine what it could do at ten hours. >> it could fly through small clearings, through trees and see inside. >> reporter: if one crashes or the camera fails, developers at the university of pennsylvania already have drones flying in siynchronized formations. in the hostage crises of the future, it could give them a swarm of available replacements. >> reporter: we know defense secretary leon panetta personally approved a request from the fbi to get high tech sur
the highest. what kind of environment do you want to create a business in? in california, the next ten years you're going to be paying for someone else's spending. >> maybe you guys can remember a time when a governor of one state actually addressed people in another state? >> sure. >> go ahead. >> it does happen. >> arnold schwarzenegger. had he a bust. california was booming and governor schwarzenegger had a moving van that he took to nevada and the whole thing crashed. >> texas is known to have a few wrestlers. so they are going to california to wrestle some business. >> governor brown's office directed me to a "bloomberg" story that said california created 345,000 jobs and texas only 45. they have a more per capita income. i love texas. i'd much rather live there. but governor perry is modestly gifted and could use a little humility. >> good line there. all right, guys, thanks very much for coming in. >>> lance armstrong's career may be over but his legal troubles may only be beginning. we're going to tell you what may be in store. this is stacy from springfield. oh whoa. hello? yes. i d
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)